Author Archives: Jonathan Story, Professor Emeritus, INSEAD

About Jonathan Story, Professor Emeritus, INSEAD

Jonathan Story is Emeritus Professor of International Political Economy at INSEAD. Prior to joining INSEAD in 1974, he worked in Brussels and Washington, where he obtained his PhD from Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. He has held the Marusi Chair of Global Business at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and is currently Distinguished Visiting Professor at the Graduate Schoold of Business, Fordham University, New York. He is preparing a monograph on China’s impact on the world political economy, and another on a proposal for a contextual approach to business studies. He has a chapter forthcoming on the Euro crisis. His latest book is China UnCovered: What you need to know to do business in China, (FT/ Pearson’s, 2010) (www.chinauncovered.net) His previous books include “China: The Race to Market” (FT/Pearsons, 2003), The Frontiers of Fortune, (Pitman’s, 1999); and The Political Economy of Financial Integration in Europe : The Battle of the Systems,(MIT Press, 1998) on monetary union and financial markets in the EU, and co-authored with Ingo Walter of NYU. His books have been translated into French, Italian, German, Spanish, Chinese, Korean and Arabic. He is also a co-author in the Oxford Handbook on Business and Government(2010), and has contributed numerous chapters in books and articles in professional journals. He is a regular contributor to newspapers, and has been four times winner of the European Case Clearing House “Best Case of the Year” award. His latest cases detail hotel investments in Egypt and Argentina, as well as a women’s garment manufacturer in Sri Lanka and a Chinese auto parts producer. He teaches courses on international business and the global political economy. At the INSEAD campus, in Fontainebleau and Singapore, he has taught European and world politics, markets, and business in the MBA, and PhD programs. He has taught on INSEAD’s flagship Advanced Management Programme for the last three decades, as well as on other Executive Development and Company Specific courses. Jonathan Story works with governments, international organisations and multinational corporations. He is married with four children, and, now, thirteen grandchildren. Besides English, he is fluent in French, German, Spanish, Italian, reads Portuguese and is learning Russian. He has a bass voice, and gives concerts, including Afro-American spirituals, Russian folk, classical opera and oratorio.

Brexit and the British Constitution: Part IV. The Roots of British Supranationalism.

The photo on the front is of David Lloyd George, Prime Minister of Great Britain from 1916 to 1922. His Liberal-Conservative government fell part in late 1922, and the Liberal Party remained out of power for nearly a century. Now … Continue reading

Posted in Europe, European integration, France and Germany, United Kingdom, World politics, business and economics, World war | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Brexit and the British Constitution: Part III. Efficiency, Parliamentary Sovereignty, Bureaucracy.

The Three Simplifiers. “What is the origin of this seemingly inexorable tendency to get rid of the old checks and balances, asks Ferdinand Mount, to peel off the ancient gnarled bark and hack away the tangle of intertwining and overhanging … Continue reading

Posted in Constitutional law, India, United Kingdom | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

The Supreme Court’s judgement on Prime Minister Johnson’s decision to prorogue parliament: Part IV. New law or constitutional aberration?

The Supreme Court judgement: new law or constitutional aberration? I will not pretend to my own position: the root of the British uncoded Constitution is the Bill of Rights of 1689, and subsequent court judgments and statutes. This states that … Continue reading

Posted in Constitutional law, Europe, United Kingdom | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

The Supreme Court’s judgement on Prime Minister Johnson’s decision to prorogue Parliament: Part III. Assessment.

Assessment of the Supreme Court judgement. The portrait is of Sir Edward Coke in June 1614, when he was elected High Steward of the University of Cambridge. Coke was a champion of a particular view of Parliamentary Sovereignty, a view, arguably, … Continue reading

Posted in Constitutional law, Europe, United Kingdom | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

The Supreme Court’s judgement on Prime Minister Johnson’s decision to prorogue Parliament: Part II. The Arguments for and against.

The argument that Johnson’s  decision to prorogue is not justiciable. There are two judgements-that of Lord Doherty sitting in the Outer House of the (Scottish) Court of Sessions on September 4, and the judgement in the High Court dismissing Mrs … Continue reading

Posted in Constitutional law, Europe, United Kingdom | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

The Supreme Court judgement on Prime Minister Johnson’s decision to prorogue Parliament: Part I: Definitions and timeline.

On 24 September 2019, in a unanimous decision by eleven justices, the UK’s Supreme Court  found Prime Minister Johnson’s advice to the Queen to prorogue parliament from September  9 and 12 September 2019 until the State Opening of Parliament on … Continue reading

Posted in Constitutional law, Europe, United Kingdom | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Apocalypse and Guilt: Why Savonarola and Greta differ.

In 1492, Girolamo Savonarola, the Dominican friar warned of the terrible tribulations threatening to engulf Rome, the City of Popes. In one of his sermons, the friar thundered that he saw a hand appearing in the sky bearing a flaming … Continue reading

Posted in Christianity, Climate Change, Guilt, Machiavelli | Tagged , , , | 4 Comments