Tag Archives: Constitutional law

Brexit and the British Constitution: Part V. Modernisation or Vandalism?

This is the last in the series of articles on Brexit and the Constitution. It is based on four books which have dealt with the subject over the last twenty years: Vernon Bogdanor, Professor of Government at King’s College, London, … Continue reading

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Brexit and the British Constitution: Part III. Efficiency, Parliamentary Sovereignty, Bureaucracy.

The Three Simplifiers. “What is the origin of this seemingly inexorable tendency to get rid of the old checks and balances, asks Ferdinand Mount, to peel off the ancient gnarled bark and hack away the tangle of intertwining and overhanging … Continue reading

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The Supreme Court’s judgement on Prime Minister Johnson’s decision to prorogue parliament: Part IV. New law or constitutional aberration?

The Supreme Court judgement: new law or constitutional aberration? I will not pretend to my own position: the root of the British uncoded Constitution is the Bill of Rights of 1689, and subsequent court judgments and statutes. This states that … Continue reading

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The Supreme Court’s judgement on Prime Minister Johnson’s decision to prorogue Parliament: Part III. Assessment.

Assessment of the Supreme Court judgement. The portrait is of Sir Edward Coke in June 1614, when he was elected High Steward of the University of Cambridge. Coke was a champion of a particular view of Parliamentary Sovereignty, a view, arguably, … Continue reading

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The Supreme Court’s judgement on Prime Minister Johnson’s decision to prorogue Parliament: Part II. The Arguments for and against.

The argument that Johnson’s  decision to prorogue is not justiciable. There are two judgements-that of Lord Doherty sitting in the Outer House of the (Scottish) Court of Sessions on September 4, and the judgement in the High Court dismissing Mrs … Continue reading

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